Zebari: No Civil War in Iraq, Geneva II Not Easy

Written by  Published by:Shiite News
Published in Iraq
Monday, 01 July 2013


zebariIraq's foreign minister assured Saturday the deadliest and most sustained wave of violence to hit the country since 2008 won't lead to civil war.

Hoshyar Zebari further stated that Iraqis have been close to civil war in the past "and there is no

In parallel, the Iraqi minister insisted that "a decade after Saddam Hussein was topple, Iraq is far better off than countries emerging from the Arab spring that are struggling to find a new system of government, build institutions and write constitutions."
"Iraq is not crashing," Zebari said. "The crisis is manageable."
Zebari said one reason he doesn't think Iraq will go "over the edge" into civil war is the success of recent local elections, where Iraqis "voted conscientiously" and "there has been major, major changes."

Next year, Iraq will hold a general election that could change parliament and the government, now led by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.
"You will see the next election would be the most significant elections in the new Iraq," Zebari said. "There will be new alliances. The old alliances have crumbled, and there could be cross-sectarian, cross-ethnic alliances."
He also pointed to Iraq's extremely good economic performance that has significantly raised per capita income.

Last year Iraq became the second-largest oil producer in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, and is now churning out more than 3 million barrels of crude a day. The World Bank expects Iraq's economy to grow by 9 percent this year, compared with just over 2 percent for the overall global economy.
"The country is really enjoying an economic boom with investment, with oil companies, with diplomatic representation. What is lacks is really political stability, because as long as you have political discord and division, it would be reflected immediately on the security," he said.

Meanwhile, Zebari said the Syrian conflict is also having an impact on Iraq and other neighboring countries, and he urged all countries to support the fight against terrorism, which he called "an international menace."
He added Iraq has been communicating with both sides to try to help end the two-year conflict that has, "but in an armed conflict preaching doesn't help."
On this level, Zebari blamed the paralysis in the deeply divided UN Security Council for turning the Syrian conflict into a type of "proxy war, an attrition war that could be dragged on for a long time."
He said Iraq doesn't support any "militarization" of the Syrian conflict.
"Iraq is also concerned that arms destined for the rebels in Syria - from the United States and elsewhere - might make their way to Iraqi militants," he said.
The Iraq-Syria border even before the conflict was troubled, Zebari said. "But still they are quite open for movement of terrorist groups, or weapons," though Iraqi forces on occasion carry out operations to prevent militant groups from operating in the country.

Zebari flew to New York from Geneva, where he was involved in talks with senior officials from the US, Russia and the UN on preparations for an international conference that aims to get the Syrian government and the opposition into dialogue.
Zebari said "it's not easy" to organize the conference, citing differences on its purpose and problems with unifying the opposition.

Source: News Agencies, Edited by website team

"> winner, so everybody is pushing the envelope to the limit, but not pushing it over the edge."

In parallel, the Iraqi minister insisted that "a decade after Saddam Hussein was topple, Iraq is far better off than countries emerging from the Arab spring that are struggling to find a new system of government, build institutions and write constitutions."
"Iraq is not crashing," Zebari said. "The crisis is manageable."
Zebari said one reason he doesn't think Iraq will go "over the edge" into civil war is the success of recent local elections, where Iraqis "voted conscientiously" and "there has been major, major changes."

Next year, Iraq will hold a general election that could change parliament and the government, now led by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.
"You will see the next election would be the most significant elections in the new Iraq," Zebari said. "There will be new alliances. The old alliances have crumbled, and there could be cross-sectarian, cross-ethnic alliances."
He also pointed to Iraq's extremely good economic performance that has significantly raised per capita income.

Last year Iraq became the second-largest oil producer in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, and is now churning out more than 3 million barrels of crude a day. The World Bank expects Iraq's economy to grow by 9 percent this year, compared with just over 2 percent for the overall global economy.
"The country is really enjoying an economic boom with investment, with oil companies, with diplomatic representation. What is lacks is really political stability, because as long as you have political discord and division, it would be reflected immediately on the security," he said.

Meanwhile, Zebari said the Syrian conflict is also having an impact on Iraq and other neighboring countries, and he urged all countries to support the fight against terrorism, which he called "an international menace."
He added Iraq has been communicating with both sides to try to help end the two-year conflict that has, "but in an armed conflict preaching doesn't help."
On this level, Zebari blamed the paralysis in the deeply divided UN Security Council for turning the Syrian conflict into a type of "proxy war, an attrition war that could be dragged on for a long time."
He said Iraq doesn't support any "militarization" of the Syrian conflict.
"Iraq is also concerned that arms destined for the rebels in Syria - from the United States and elsewhere - might make their way to Iraqi militants," he said.
The Iraq-Syria border even before the conflict was troubled, Zebari said. "But still they are quite open for movement of terrorist groups, or weapons," though Iraqi forces on occasion carry out operations to prevent militant groups from operating in the country.

Zebari flew to New York from Geneva, where he was involved in talks with senior officials from the US, Russia and the UN on preparations for an international conference that aims to get the Syrian government and the opposition into dialogue.
Zebari said "it's not easy" to organize the conference, citing differences on its purpose and problems with unifying the opposition.

Source: News Agencies, Edited by website team

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